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NIH Conference on VBAC’S ~ Continuing to Spread the Word

Spreading the word from the NIH VBAC conference….It’s now coming thru via AWHONN Vitals!!!

This is at least a month old news to most birth junkies but….. but I find it encouraging that the news is coming thru from AWHONN (Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses). There are many many nurses and birth professionals out there that haven’t even heard about this conference. I know the big AWHONN convention is coming up in Nashville June 12th, and possibly this topic will be presented somewhere although late to get on agenda. Sometimes the nurses can help educate the docs…… ya think?

One topic on the Nashville Agenda is:

“SOLUTIONS FOR SURVIVAL: Working where Birth is NOT Considered NORMAL”

Boy~ would I love to go to that presentation!!!!!

From the recent AWHONN newsletter~

“Panel Urges New Look at Caesarean Guidelines”
The New York Times, Denise Grady
A government panel recently took steps that will increase women’s ability to find doctors and hospitals that will let them attempt a normal birth after a previous caesarean section. The recommendations came from a panel at a National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference convened to assess why the rate of vaginal birth after Caesarean section (VBAC) has gone from 28.3% in 1996 to less than 10% today. The repeat surgeries are contributing to the growing rates of C-sections in the U.S., which today account for nearly a third of all deliveries. Repeat C-sections were previously deemed safer due to concerns that the uterine scar would rupture, putting both the mother and the baby at significant risk. According to the chairman of the NIH conference, “We found the use of VBAC is certainly a safe alternative for the majority of women who’ve had one prior” C-section, as long as the incision was horizontal and low on the uterus. Approximately 70% of women who have had C-sections are good candidates for attempting a normal birth, and 60% to 80% of those who try succeed. The government panel urged the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society of Anesthesiologists to “reassess” their guidelines, which have rendered many clinicians and hospitals unwilling to allow VBACs. The groups’ current guidelines require that surgical and anesthesia teams be “immediately available” during labor if a women has had a prior C-section. Some institutions were unable to comply, and thus banned VBACs altogether.
Link to Article

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